Terje Hauge, Ambassador and head of Norway’s team of negotiators, Minister Counsellor Knut Langeland and Norway’s Permanent Representative to the UN, Ambassador Geir O.Pedersen congratulating each other after the vote. 
Photo: NorwayUN/Marte Lerberg Kopstad.Terje Hauge, Ambassador and head of Norway’s team of negotiators, Minister Counsellor Knut Langeland and Norway’s Permanent Representative to the UN, Ambassador Geir O.Pedersen congratulating each other after the vote. Photo: NorwayUN/Marte Lerberg Kopstad

Historic Arms Trade Treaty adopted by the General Assembly

4/2/2013 // 154 countries voted yes to adopt the first international Arms Trade Treaty in the UN General Assembly today. “This treaty constitutes a good framework for regulating the global arms trade in a way that will reduce human suffering,” said Terje Hauge, Ambassador and head of Norway’s team of negotiators to the Arms Trade Treaty Conference, in his statement.

Mr. President,

This is truly a historic day. After many years of hard work and two failed attempts we have finally reached our goal and concluded an Arms Trade Treaty. The process has been difficult and complex but also driven by relentless determination and hope among the overwhelming majority of states that have worked hard for a strong and robust treaty. Today we harvest the reward.

We will not add much to what has already been said on behalf of us and many others in the joint statement delivered by Mexico. We do want to emphasize that this treaty constitutes a good framework for regulating the global arms trade in a way that will reduce human suffering.

We are satisfied that human rights law and humanitarian law have been given such a strong and prominent place in this Treaty text. The provisions regarding prohibitions and export assessment reflect these bodies of law in a comprehensive manner. We are also pleased that the risk of gender based violence and violence against women and children is among the criteria that have to be assessed before authorizing an export.

The provisions on prohibition on transfers pertain to serious violations of all international obligations under international agreements, which clearly include human rights obligations. They also prohibit transfers that would be used for the commission of genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes.

In addition, the treaty lays down an unequivocal obligation not to authorize a transfer if there is an overriding risk of negative consequences such as serious violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, in addition to treaty obligations on terrorism and transnational organized crime.

We will apply the provisions of this treaty to a broad range of conventional arms, as the Treaty encourages us to do.

Norway looks forward towards cooperating with other states on the implementation of the Arms Trade Treaty.

Mr. President,

We are ready to start the work that lies ahead of us.

Thank you


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