Members of the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT) participate in tactics and logistics exercises with the national police force in East Timor. 
Photo: UN Photo/Martine Perret.Members of the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT) participate in tactics and logistics exercises with the national police force in East Timor. Photo: UN Photo/Martine Perret

Making UN police more effective

10/26/2009 // Police involvement in peacekeeping operations has doubled over the last two years. This trend looks set to continue. That’s why Norway today announced that it will fund the development of a strategic doctrinal framework for international police peacekeeping.

Police officers that take part in UN peacekeeping operations are from a variety of Police Contributing Countries (PCC). As such they come to the job with different cultural backgrounds and varying degrees of training. That’s why the need for a framework for “One UN Police” has been identified. The goal of such a framework would be to provide a consistent model for policing. This would help UN police as they seek to protect civilians and implement the mandate of building local police capacity.

 

Norway’s contribution to this work was announced in a statement to the General Assembly as part of the discussion on UN Global Peacekeeping Operations. In his statement, Norway’s Permanent Representative to the UN, Morten Wetland, also underlined that the protection of civilians deserved more attention. In addition Ambassador Wetland called for a sharper focus on effect and output in the planning and staffing of UN operations. He also emphasised the need to strengthen field support strategy.

 

Read Ambassador Wetland's full statement here.


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